Long Description of the Images

Flow Chart depicting how MDF works:

MDF identifies opportunities in the economy for pro-poor growth, which leads to MDF develops partnerships with business and business regulators to increase growth and improve service delivery; which leads to partners implement improved business practices; which leads to markets around the poor work better; which leads to the poor benefit from improved access and growth; which leads to additional jobs and income are created for the poor.  [end of description].

Table of MDF Targets:

Table shows Targets for goal level indicators for Fiji and Timor-Leste, and the Facility as a whole. Number of Self-employed people with increased income target for Fiji is 12,000; targets for Timor-Leste is 9,000; so total MDF target is 21,000.  Number of new jobs created target for Fiji is 1,100; target; target for Timor-Leste is 800; so total MDF target is 1,900.  Total outreach target for Fiji is 14,200; total target for Timor-Leste is 10,600; so total MDF target is 24,800. [end of description].

Diagram of MDF Output and Goal level Indicators:

Diagram shows a breakdown of Expected changes and Indicators for each Strategic Level. The Strategic Levels are are: Outputs, Outcomes, Purpose and Goal.  At the Output Level, expected change is increased capacity of partners to service target sectors; while indicators used are Innovation, Investment, and Reform. At the Outcome Level, the expected change is improved service delivery in sectors. There are no discreet indicators at this level, but improved service delivery of partners will show additional transaction value, increased usage or awareness by end beneficiaries. It is expected that signs of markets working better will lead to competitors crowding into the market.  At the Purpose Level, the expected change is increased competitiveness in sectors. There are no discreet indicators at this level, but increased competitiveness will show increases in productivity and sales. It is expected that improved business practice is copied from one enterprise to the next.  At the Goal Level, the expected change is sustainable pro-poor growth; while indicators used are Income and Employment. [end of description].

Diagram of MDF’s Overall Strategy for stimulating Pro-poor Growth in Fiji:

The diagram shows characteristics of Poverty, Growth and Development Challenges in Fiji. It then shows how MDF will work in Fiji to influence those; and what the Expected Results would be. Poverty in Fiji is characterised by: 71% of the population is poor or vulnerable to fall into poverty. Poorest regions are Northern and Western Division. Concentrated in rural areas with subsistence-oriented farming increasing. Also concentrations around urban areas, with an increase in rural-urban migration. Strong correlation with lack of employment opportunities.

Growth in Fiji is characterised by: 0% average growth rate over the last five years. Low and declining investment. Only 40% wage earning employment. High imports and growing trade deficit. Declining agricultural output.

Challenges in Fiji: industries once key for GDP and employment are declining. Lack of alternative employment opportunities. Lack of economic diversification. Need for geographic diversification.

MDF in Fiji: Focuses on key sectors with high growth potential to capture opportunities for sustainable pro-poor growth. Tourism and Related Support Services and Industries and Horticulture and Agro-exports identified as growing sectors with the potential to generate employment opportunities and improve livelihoods for many rural families. Partners with local businesses and organisations within those sectors to develop innovative ideas that address constraints to growth, increase business performance, and improve service delivery which benefits the poor

Expected results in Fiji:  Activities stimulate economic growth, creating approximately 1,100 new jobs and increasing incomes for 12,000 households.  Access to essential products and services improves for poor producers and consumers.  Livelihood opportunities are created in areas with few alternatives. Local production and exports increase, replacing costly imports. [end of description].

MDF’s Strategy Table for Horticulture and Agro-Export Sector in Fiji:

Table depicts constraints to growth in the Horticulture Sector, and MDF’s strategy to address each constraint and unlock growth.

Constraint area One: Dependence on a limited number of market channels and means of transportation limits the growth potential of horticulture and agriculture in general. MDF’s strategy: To work with exporters and wholesalers to access new market channels with more diversified produce, new markets, new modes of transportation or new manners of processing, packing and preservation

Constraint area Two: Limited access to extension services or other alternatives for farmers results in farmers using ineffective cultivation techniques, experiencing low yields and facing high rejection rates for export. MDF’s strategy: To encourage backward linkages and private extension services which address areas that help increase farmer productivity, consistency and quality.

Constraint area three: Limited access to relevant information on farming where and when farmers need it, also results in farmers applying ineffective cultivation techniques, experiencing low yields and facing high rejection rates for export. MDF’s strategy: To work with local businesses to provide access for famers to relevant and accurate information on cultivation techniques and input use, so that it is available where, when and how the farmers need it.

Constraint area four: Limited access to good quality and appropriate agricultural inputs (seeds, fertiliser and crop protection) and equipment prevents farmers from getting higher yields and better prices for a higher quality product, cultivating more land, and diversifying crops and seasons. MDF’s strategy: To work with local agriculture suppliers to provide low cost effective equipment and appropriate and quality production inputs for farmers.

Constraint area five: The short cultivation window currently utilises results in temporal overproduction followed by periods characterised by undersupply, affecting the price farmers can get for their produce; and limiting exports or year-round supply opportunities. MDF’s strategy: To work with local agriculture suppliers to provide information and materials for year-round production so that farmers can extend cultivation beyond one season and provide a consistent supply of produce.

Constraint area six: The limited number of crops currently cultivated results in overproduction while leaving opportunities in other crops underutilised. MDF’s strategy: To work with local businesses to introduce new crops, by providing cultivation inputs and knowledge to farmers.

Constraint area seven: More could be done to mitigate and manage risks related to flooding, storms or improper disease control, as these undermine consistent supply and willingness to invest in horticulture cultivation. MDF’s strategy: Maintain specific focus on increasing access to good agricultural practices that help reduce agricultural risk and promote environmentally and socially responsible business.

Constraint area eight: More could be done to promote high value agriculture, which can accept slightly higher transportation cost, in areas farther from main markets, such as Vanua Levu. MDF’s strategy: Maintain specific focus on promoting horticulture and commercial agriculture opportunities on Vanua Levu. [end of description].

MDF’s Strategy Table for Tourism and Supporting Sectors in Fiji:

Table depicts constraints to growth in the Tourism and support sectors and MDF’s strategy to address each constraint and unlock growth.

Constraint area one: Domestic and International transportation linkages are limited, inefficient and expensive, making it difficult for tourists to get to and travel within Fiji. MDF’s strategy: To encourage improvements in international and domestic travel linkages, opening up options for tourists, and improving efficiency and cost.

Constraint area two: A lack of well-organised travel information and booking options prevent tourists from arranging longer or more diverse trips. MDF’s strategy: To support local organisations to offer diversified, informative and well-organised online travel information and streamlined booking options for tourists.

Constraint area three: Limited shopping and entertainment activities outside of resorts restrict tourist spending and decrease demand for locally made products. MDF’s Strategy: To work with local suppliers and producers to offer more diversified locally-produced goods attractive to tourists; and more diversified activities and entertainment options for tourists.

Constraint area four: High use of imported produce and processed food results in tourism spending leaving Fiji through higher imports and puts increasing pressure on tight margins for hotels, resorts and restaurants. MDF’s Strategy: To work with local wholesalers to offer more year-round processed and fresh produce for use in hotels, restaurants and resorts.

Constraint area five: Lack of awareness of Pacific cuisine results in limited use of locally available produce by chefs and higher imports. MDF’s strategy: To encourage promotion of Pacific cuisine and the use of locally available ingredients, enhancing the tourist experience in Fiji and increasing purchase of local produce.

Constraint area six: Lack of hospitality skills that match the cost-level and ambitions of Fiji as an exclusive destination. MDF’s Strategy: To work with local organisations to increase access to appropriate hospitality and hotel management skills.

Constraint area seven: Hotels and resorts use a high percentage of imported non-food supplies due to lack of suitable local manufacturers or suppliers, thus increasing costs and imports. MDF’s strategy: To work with local businesses on innovative solutions to offer locally produced non-food related supplies for hotels, resorts and restaurants.

Constraint area eight: More could be done to brand Fiji as a ‘green’ or ‘unspoiled paradise’ destination, to strengthen its brand and mitigate the environmental impacts of tourism. MDF’s strategy: Maintain specific focus on promoting use of sustainable practices in the tourism industry, such as renewable energy or organic farming.

Constraint area nine: More could be done to stimulate tourism in areas with few economic alternatives such as Vanua Levu. MDF’s strategy: Maintain specific focus on capturing opportunities on Vanua Levu.